CALIFORNIA
Study: Pfizer-CCOGC Biospecimen Repository study
Location:  University of California Veterinary Hospital Davis, CA
Phone:     (530) 752-1393, ext 431
www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/clinicaltrials/current_trials/dogs.cfm

Eligibility: Dogs with a confirmed diagnosis of oral malignant melanoma

Summary: UC Davis in collaboration with Pfizer-CCOGC Biospecimen Repository is collecting samples to populate a tissue
bank for future research studies. The goal of the CCOGC and UC Davis will be to populate the Pfizer-CCOGC Biospecimen
Repository with diseased tissues and specific normal tissues from dogs with cancer over the next three years. The study is
guided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Participation requirements:
  • Owner consent to allow collection of the clinical specimens and to comply with follow-up and treatment requirements.
    The owner only needs to consent to the sample being collected at the time of the visit.
  • General clinical evaluation, including medical history, physical exam, complete blood count, biochemical profile, and
    urinalysis
  • Histological diagnosis
  • Complete staging evaluation, to include cytology or histology of submandibular lymph nodes, thoracic radiographs
  • Histology of primary site

Procedures: After receiving consent from owners, a sample of the tumor is banked following the CCOGC criteria.

Benefits: There is no cost to the owner for participation in this study. The samples collected will be stored for future use of
investigators with the ultimate goal of developing a treatment and prevention for the variety of cancers.


FLORIDA
Study: Vaccine Study for Dogs with Melanoma
Location: University of Florida
Phone: 352-392-2235 or Dr. Rowan Milner at milnerr@ufl.edu
http://research.vetmed.ufl.edu/clinical-trials/small-animal/melanoma-vaccine-study-for-dogs/

Eligibility: Any dog recently diagnosed witth malignant melanoma that is resectable or minimal and does not have other life
threatening diseases.  The doctors will explain this to you.

Summary: Melanoma (cancer of pigment producing cells in the body) is malignant cancer in both humans and animals.  
Some forms of melanoma in the dog follow a similar aggressive pathway as it does in humans.  The main treatment for
melanoma in dogs is surgery, however this cancer often spreads in the body and shortens the survival time.  Radiation
treatment and chemotherapy have been used in combination with surgery but results are still poor.  Because this type of
cancer has been known to cause an immune reaction in people and in animals, developing a vaccine holds promise to use
in addition to surgery.  Vaccines are often used because they stimulate a response inside the body to fight infection or
prevent infection. It is our hope that this vaccine will stimulate a response in the body to kill the cancer that is present.  In
prior laboratory experiments and clinical trials in healthy dogs, we have seen that this vaccine causes the body to produce
a response that kills melanoma cells.

The University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine is currently recruiting dogs recently diagnosed with malignant
melanoma for a clinical research trial.  This investigational trial is for the development of a vaccine for the future treatment
or prevention of melanoma in dogs.

Participation involves 7 visits to the clinic in one year and follow up visits every 3 months following treatment.  Blood will be
drawn on your dog’s first visit to compare with blood drawn later in the study.  The vaccine will be given 3 times in 3
separate body locations approximately 4 weeks apart.

Financial incentive: The study will pay for the vaccine and costs associated with monitoring your dog’s immune response.
You are responsible to pay for office visits.


WISCONSIN
Study: To examine the effects of a combination of radiation therapy and Palladia on the immune system
Location:  University of Wisconsin Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Madison, WI
Phone:  (608) 263-7600
www.uwveterinarycare.wisc.edu/rdvm/clinical_trials.html

Summary: Melanoma is the most common oral tumor diagnosed in dogs. When the local tumor is not resectable, radiation
therapy is the local treatment of choice. Palladia is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor FDA approved for the treatment of mast
cell tumors in dogs. Recent studies have indicated activity of Palladia in a range of canine tumors and a potential role in
the restoration of immune function. In humans, a structurally similar medication has been shown to enhance the effects of
radiation. Recently, it has been suggested in canine patients that radiation in combination with Palladia may have a
synergistic (additive) effect. Despite being a local treatment, radiation has also been shown to alter the systemic immune
response against the tumor.

Purpose: The aim of this study is to examine the effects of a combination of radiation therapy and Palladia on the immune
system. The trial will be blinded and placebo controlled. Patients will be administered Palladia or a placebo for 1 week prior
to commencing and then during radiation therapy. Blood samples will be collected at the time of each radiation therapy
treatment. A standard accepted radiation protocol will be used.

Financial Incentive: Clients are required to pay for the initial diagnosis and staging of their dog. If accepted into the clinical
trial, the client’s UW Veterinary Care account will be credited $300 (three hundred dollars). Palladia will be provided free of
charge. The owner will be responsible for all other costs. After the 6-week study period, dogs that received placebo may
then receive Palladia, with no charge for the medication; however, costs for clinic visits and evaluations remain the owner’s
responsibility.

Study: Biopsy for Dogs with Melanoma or Primary Lung Tumor
Location:  University of Wisconsin Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Madison, WI
Phone:  (608) 263-7600
www.uwveterinarycare.wisc.edu/rdvm/clinical_trials.html

Summary: Melanoma is the most common oral tumor diagnosed in dogs. When the local tumor is not resectable, radiation
therapy is the local treatment of choice. Palladia is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor FDA approved for the treatment of mast
cell tumors in dogs. Recent studies have indicated activity of Palladia in a range of canine tumors and a potential role in
the restoration of immune function. In humans, a structurally similar medication has been shown to enhance the effects of
radiation. Recently, it has been suggested in canine patients that radiation in combination with Palladia may have a
synergistic (additive) effect. Despite being a local treatment, radiation has also been shown to alter the systemic immune
response against the tumor.

Purpose: The aim of this study is to examine the effects of a combination of radiation therapy and Palladia on the immune
system. The trial will be blinded and placebo controlled. Patients will be administered Palladia or a placebo for 1 week prior
to commencing and then during radiation therapy. Blood samples will be collected at the time of each radiation therapy
treatment. A standard accepted radiation protocol will be used.

Financial Incentive: The cost of surgical biopsy collection, a necessary diagnostic step in the majority of patient work-ups,
is completely covered in most cases (unless involving open cavity collection).
PET CANCER CENTER
Comprehensive guide to cancer diagnosis and treatment in cats and dogs
© 2007 Pet Cancer Center. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Last updated 8/16/13
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